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    When they tell you it's all "global warming".....

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    sinister_midget
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    When they tell you it's all "global warming".....

    Post  sinister_midget on Sun Sep 03, 2017 9:35 am

    Show them this picture of downtown Houston in 1935.





    Or this one:




    Houston's devastating flood of 1935

    The residents of Shady Acres, west of Shepherd and north of White Oak Bayou, were desperate.

    Rains had caused the bayou to rise before, but this was a disaster in the making. For three families living on West 21st Street, the water was probably inside their homes. Getting out was impossible. When, or how, they would be rescued was anyone guess.

    So, out of options, someone scrawled out a note, put it in a bottle, and threw it into the floodwaters.

    "We need help out here in Shady Acres. The water is all over everthing -- the cat is in the attic, so hurry and help us -- just anybody."

    Help would eventually come and all the families out there were brought to higher ground.

    That was one of the many stories that played out across central Houston in December 1935. Similar tales played out again last week as torrential rain dropped up to 11 inches on parts of the Houston area.

    This latest round of flooding stirred memories of Tropical Storm Allison in 2001. Some of you might even remember the flooding from Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979. But few out there reading this lived through the flood of 1935. In those pre-Allison years, that flood was the one that broke all records, the one that all subsequent floods were compared to.

    Damage from the 1935 flood totaled nearly $3 million -- or $52 million in today's dollars. (By comparison, Allison's damage totaled $9 billion.) Seven died in the flooding, five of whom were children. (More on the flooding can be found in this 1937 report local leaders prepared for state legislators.)

    Before the floodwaters could completely recede, the local papers issued a call for action to prevent it from happening again. As the Houston Chronicle wrote in a front-page editorial on Dec. 9, 1935:

    We must not forget this tragedy as we did the one in 1929. Houston has been visited by four serious floods in the last 40 years, each worse than the preceding one. The Chronicle has pointed out repeatedly since 1929 that the improved drainage in the western part of the county, the development of widespread Houston residential sections, with storm sewers turning floods of water into the bayou after every rain, has steadlily increased the hazard. Added to this now, is widespread WPA drainage work, which turns water from broad areas more rapidly into the bayous and speeds it through cleaned and straightened channels to the heart of Houston -- where it strikes a veritable bottleneck.

    This county simply can not now be drained by that little stream reaching from the Farmer's Market through the jumble of buildings and beneath low bridges to the Main Street Viaduct. Nor can it be drained by the winding, undeepened bayou leading from Main Street to the Turning Basin.

    It was floods like this one, and an earlier one in 1929, that led local and state officials to establish the Harris County Flood Control District. Working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the two agencies created the Addicks and Barker reservoirs in far west Houston to control downstream flooding along Buffalo Bayou.

    The article was written in 2015.


    _________________
    One of the most important reasons for studying history is that
    virtually every stupid idea that is in vogue today has been tried
    before and proved disastrous before, time and again.
    --  Thomas Sowell
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    JJRobinson

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    Re: When they tell you it's all "global warming".....

    Post  JJRobinson on Mon Sep 04, 2017 7:12 am

    I was in Tropical Storm Claudette in July of 79...I was in Freeport and was a roving reporter for KBRZ radio...That was the first time the floodgates had been closed...I was down in Surfside and was reporting from a paytelephone, when shots rang out...They asked me what was happening and the Sheriff of Brazoria County was sitting there listening in his car wrote on a piece of paper,"snakes"...It was actually looters, and he didn't want the locals coming back to watch their property...He didn't put up with looters...

      Current date/time is Thu Sep 21, 2017 2:23 pm